Syllabus and Calendar - Comp 1302-11515 (Summer 2017)

Eng 1302

English Composition & Research

Summer 2017

English Department

 

 

Instructor information

Anastasia Constance Soullier

[email protected]

Appointments available upon request

course description and objectives

Course Description

In English 1302, students learn persuasive/argumentative writing, critical/literary analysis of reading selections and the research process. All elements of English 1302 require students to apply the critical thinking and writing skills introduced in English 1301, to analyze and interpret various forms of spoken communication, and to communicate orally in clear, coherent, and persuasive language appropriate to purpose, occasion, and audience. By successfully completing the course, students will be able to:

  1. Apply basic principles of rhetorical analysis.
  2. Write essays that classify, explain, and evaluate rhetorical and literary strategies employed in argument, persuasion, and various forms of literature.
  3. Identify, differentiate, integrate, and synthesize research materials into argumentative and/or analytical essays.
  4. Employ appropriate documentation style and format across the spectrum of in-class and out-of-class written discourse.
  5. Demonstrate library literacy.

Prerequisites

 ENG 1301

Course Objectives

  • use the conventions of academic arguments
  • create various types of academic arguments
  • support claims with evidence
  • determine what counts as evidence in differing situations
  • shape written arguments for particular audiences
  • conduct basic source‐based research
  • integrate research material into an academic paper
  • evaluate the evidence and claims of other writers
  • document source material using MLA or APA style (determined by instructor)

Textbooks

Arguing about literature

John Schlib and John Clifford

ISBN-13: 978-1457662096

 

OTHER MATERIALS

2 Scantrons for the Midterm and Final Exams

Come prepared for class with a notebook and pen. Flash drives are recommended to back up assignments.

Course Outline, Grading, and Participation Requirements.

Course Outline

See Course Schedule for this information

Names and Descriptions of Required Assignments and [Points or Percentages] for Each Assignment

Grading Scale

Writing Assignments, Group Projects, Rough Drafts, Peer Editing, Discussion and Homework Assignments and Quizzes....45%

Essay 1...........................10%

 Essay 2..........................10%

Essay 3...........................10%

Midterm...........................10%

Final................................15%

Total- 100%

 

Grading Scale

The following grading scale will be used:

A = 4.0 to 3.60

B = 2.70 to 3.59

C = 1.70 to 2.69

D = 1.33- 1.69

F = 0 to 1.32

Class Management Information

Attendance Policy

A student who misses 4 classes will be dismissed from the class. Two late arrivals are the equivalent of a single absence. Students arriving after the first 10 minutes of class will not be credited with attending. Excused absences will be assessed on an individual basis.

A new policy has gone into effect that requires that students who have not dropped by the official drop date must receive a final grade. Students must make sure to officially drop the class by the deadline in order to avoid receiving a failing grade.

 

 

COMMUNICATION:

I will answer all emails as soon as possible, 72 hours should be allowed. This means do not email questions at the last minute before an assignment is due. Time will be given in class for questions and concerns, take advantage of this time. If you have missed class you should get notes, assignments and information from another student.

 

Late Work Policy

Late work will not be accepted, he/she may not make up the missed work unless the absence is excused under the attendence policy. Late essays will be accepted, these will lose 10% for everyday they are late. Students will be allowed one re-write at the end of the semester.

Plagiarism Policy

Scholastic Dishonesty: According to the Student Handbook for HCCS, scholastic dishonesty includes:

According to the Student Handbook for the Houston Community College System, scholastic dishonesty includes cheating on a test, plagiarism, and collusion.

Cheating on a test includes:

-copying from another student's test paper; using (during a test) materials not authorized by the person giving the test;

-collaborating with another student during a test without authority;

-knowingly using, buying, selling, stealing, transporting, or soliciting in whole or part the contents of an unadministered test;

-bribing another person to obtain a test that is to be administered.

Plagiarism means the appropriation of another's work and the unacknowledged incorporation of that work into one's own written work offered for credit.

Collusion means the unauthorized collaboration with another person in preparing written work offered for credit.

Please note the possible consequences of such dishonesty, as stated in the current Student Handbook“Possible punishments for academic dishonesty may include a grade of 0 or F for the particular assignment, failure in the course, and/or recommendation for probation or dismissal from the College System” (41).

Please note the possible consequences of such dishonesty, as stated in the Student Handbook: "Possible punishments for academic dishonesty may include a grade of 0 or F for the particular assignment, failure in the course, and/or recommendation for probation or dismissal from the College System".

NOTICE: Students who repeat a course for a third or more times may soon
 face significant tuition/fee increases at HCC and other Texas public 
colleges and universities. Please ask your instructor / counselor about
 opportunities for tutoring / other assistance prior to considering 
course withdrawal or if you are not receiving passing grades

Technology Policy

Cell Phones are not allowed in class. Students caught using phones, other than when given permission for class purpose, will be asked to leave the class. These students will be counted absent for that day.

OTHER BEHAVIOR POLICES

Students caught sleeping will be asked to leave and receive an absence.

Students cheating will receive a zero for the assignment.

Students talking excessively during a lecture time will be asked to leave.

Students more than 10 minutes late to class are considered absent.

Additional HCC Policies

SUPPORT SERVICES:

 Tutoring: Free tutoring is available

 REASONBLE ACCOMIDATIONS:

The Office of Students with Disabilities.

 Any student with a documented disability (e.g. physical, learning,

psychiatric, vision, hearing, etc.) who needs to arrange reasonable

accommodations must contact the Disability Services Office at the

respective college at the beginning of each semester. Faculty is authorized

to provide only the accommodations requested by the Disability Support

Services Office.

 For questions, please contact Donna Price at 713.718.5165 or the Disability Counselor at your college. To visit the ADA Web site, please visit www.hccs.edu then click Future students, scroll down the page and click on the words Disability Information. At Central, this office is located in LHSB Room 106 (713-718-6164).

  EGLS3 (Evaluation for Greater Learning Student Survey System)

At Houston Community College, professors believe that thoughtful student feedback is necessary to improve teaching and learning. During a designated time near the end of the term, you will be asked to answer a short online survey of research-based questions related to instruction. The anonymous results of the survey will be made available to your professors and department chairs for continual improvement of instruction.  Go to www.hccs.edu/egls3 for more information.

 ADDENDUM

English Department: Information for Students

PURPOSE OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

To provide courses that transfer to four-year colleges; introduce students to literature from diverse traditions; prepare students to write clear, communicative, and detailed prose; and develop students’ reading, writing, and analytical skills.

 CORE CURRICULUM

All English courses fulfill the six competencies of the Core Curriculum.

READING: Reading material at the college level means having the ability to analyze and interpret a variety of printed materials—books, articles, and documents.

WRITING: Writing at the college level means having the ability to produce clear, correct, and coherent prose adapted to purpose, occasion, and audience. In addition to knowing correct grammar, spelling, and punctuation, students should also become familiar with the writing process, including how to discover a topic, how to develop and organize it, and how to phrase it effectively for their audience. These abilities are acquired through practice and reflection.

SPEAKING: Effective speaking is the ability to communicate orally in clear, coherent, and persuasive language appropriate to purpose, occasion, and audience.

LISTENING: Listening at the college level means the ability to analyze and interpret various forms of spoken communication.

CRITICAL THINKING: Critical thinking embraces methods for applying both qualitative and quantitative skills analytically and creatively to subject matter in order to evaluate arguments and to construct alternative strategies. Problem solving is one of the applications of critical thinking used to address an identified task.

COMPUTER LITERACY: Computer literacy at the college level means having the ability to use computer-based technology in communicating, solving problems, and acquiring information. Core-educated students should have an understanding of the limits, problems, and possibilities associated with the use

of technology and should have the tools necessary to evaluate and learn new technologies as they become available.

 STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Students who require reasonable accommodations for disabilities are encouraged to call (713) 718-6164 to make necessary arrangements. Faculty are only authorized to provide accommodations requested by the Disability Support Services Office.

 EGLS-- Evaluation for Greater Learning Student Survey System

At Houston Community College, professors believe that thoughtful student feedback is necessary to improve teaching and learning. During a designated time, you will be asked to answer a short online survey of research-based questions related to instruction. The anonymous results of the survey will be made available to your professors and division chairs for continual improvement of instruction. Look for the survey as part of the Houston Community College Student System online near the end of the term.

 WITHDRAWAL

According to official HCCS policy, it is the responsibility of the student to withdraw officially from a course. Failure to withdraw officially may result in a grade of “F” in the course.

A student may withdraw officially in the following ways:

1) Complete an official withdrawal form at the campus he or she is attending or at any other HCCS campus.

2) Complete an official withdrawal form at the Registrar's Office, 3100 Main Street.

3) Send a letter of withdrawal to

Registrar

Houston Community College System

  1. O. Box 667517

Houston, TX 77266-7517

SYLLABUS POLICY

This syllabus is not a binding contract between professor and students. The syllabus can be amended at any time and students will be given notice.

 

 

  • COURSE SCHEDULE* 

 

*NOTE: The syllabus/course schedule is tentative and subject to change. This only reflects planned lessons, activities, readings and major assignments such as; Exams and Essays. Responses, grammar work and quizzes are given throughout the term and NOT on the schedule. These are given in class or posted on Blackboard; it is the student’s responsibility to keep up with homework due day dates.

 

Abbreviations:       

  AL = Arguing about Literature: A Guide and Reader     

Readings are listed on the days they are due.

                                                                                                                                                        

Date

Topic

Reading(s)

Due Dates

 (minor assignments and quizzes are not listed)

DAY 1

July 10

-Introduction to the course.

-Overview of the course. Discuss syllabus, books and introductions.

-Diagnostic Writing

 

 

DAY 2

July 11

 - MLA Paper Format PowerPoint

- Critical Approaches PowerPoint

AL-p.1094-1114, 89-108

 

DAY 3

July 12

 

The Big Lebowski

-Critical Approaches and "The Dude"

AL p. 208-227

 

 

 Essay 1 is assigned July 12th

 

DAY 4

July 13

-Sources PowerPoint

- In-text Citation PowerPoint

 AL-p. 45-57, 194-203

AL-p. 1-24, 70-82

 

DAY 5

July 14

- YWP discussion 

-Rhetoric PowerPoint

 

AL-p. 779-802 "The Yellow Wallpaper", "Why I Wrote the Yellow Wallpaper", "From the Evolution of the Rest Treatment" and "From The Ladies Guide in Health and Disease"

 

DAY 6

July 17

- Rough Draft and Peer Edit

 

AL-p. 121-137

 

Essay 1 Rough Draft Due July 17th (bring a printed paper copy to class)

DAY 7

July 18

-Character Analysis PowerPoint and Video Analysis

- Thesis Writing PowerPoint

AL-p. 112-120 

 

DAY 8

July 19

-Logical Fallacies PowerPoint

- Argument Analysis

 

 

DAY 9

July 20

 -Rogerian Argument Structure

- Essay 2 Information

AL-p.963-970 "From The Brain on Trial"

AL-p.971-973 "Why Blame Me? It Was All My Brain's Fault"

 Essay 1 Final Draft Due July 22nd by 11:59 (Upload on Blackboard)

Essay 2 is assigned July 22nd(will appear on Blackboard)

DAY 10

July 21

Penn and Teller: Bullshit analysis

 

 

Day 11

July 24

- Plot Structure PowerPoint

- Lit Devices PowerPoint

-  Analysis of Lit Devices

 AL-p. "The Things They Carried"

AL- p. 148-153

 

DAY 12

July 25

- Song/ Poem Examples

 AL- p. 1054 "Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night"

 

DAY 13

July 26

 -Song Analysis in-class

 

 

DAY 14

July 27

Midterm Review- A review sheet will be provided. This will review the readings and PowerPoints. 

 

 Essay 2 is due July 28rd by 11:59 (This should be uploaded on Blackboard by 11:59)

Essay 3 is assigned and will appear on Blackboard on July 28th

DAY 15

July 28

- Midterm is given

 

 

DAY 16

July 31

- Types of Literature PowerPoint

 -Song Analysis (in-class assignment)

"The Raven"-Edgar Alan Poe https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/48860

AL- p. 597-601 "The Man in the Well"

 

 - Group Project assigned

DAY 17

Aug. 1

 Dark Romanticism PowerPoint

Analysis of "The Raven" (in-class assignment)

Reading: Each group will be assigned a work in the Dark Romantic genre, an argument type and goals. This will culminate into a group essay and oral presentation.

 

DAY 18

Aug. 2

Toulmin Argument PowerPoint

 

 

 

DAY 19

Aug. 3 

 No class (training for me) 

Essay 3 is due and Group Project work

 

 

DAY 20

Aug. 4

 No class (training for me) 

Group Time- this can be done outside of class or in the classroom during class time

 

 

Day 21

Aug. 7

 

In-Class Group TIme

 

 

 

DAY 22

Aug. 8

 

Oral Presentations

 

 

 

Group Papers and Presentations are Due

(One group member should upload the essay to Blackboard)

 this is due Aug. 7nd by 11:59

In-class presentations are due Aug. 8th.

 

 

DAY 23

Aug. 9

 

Review for the Final

 

Review PowerPoints and Texts

 

 

DAY 24

Aug. 10

 

Final Examination

 

 

 

The final is an in-class final to be administered during

the time to be specified for each section. Bluebook required.