High School vs College Handouts

This set contains three documents to help you be successful in college as a whole, not just in the classroom. Remember, a dual credit (d.c.) course is **a college course for which you also receive high school credit.** The grade you receive for a d.c. course also appears on your high school transcript. If you fail a d.c. course, you fail your high school credit, and this could affect when you graduate and scholarship applications. As this is a college course, final grade appeals go through the college, not the high school. High schools and ISD's have no say over grades for college courses.

These handouts detail differences between high school and college life, both in and out of the classroom.  Succeeding in college takes more than learning course content. You must also understand how to approach all aspects of your college experience and know what the school expects of you.  This set contains three documents to help you be successful in college as a whole, not just in the classroom.

The “Expectations” handout is a convenient table of the most common differences in behaviors and questions.  The “Assignments” sheet explains how in-class work and homework affect your overall course grade and gives you advice on approaching common college assignments. The “Accountability” handout highlights classroom and college-wide policies on grades and scholastic honesty and includes clickable links to HCC pages.

Remember, a dual credit (d.c.) course is a college course for which you also receive high school credit. The grade you receive for a d.c. course also appears on your high school transcript. If you fail a d.c. course, you fail your high school credit, and this could affect when you graduate and scholarship applications. As this is a college course, final grade appeals go through the college, not the high school. High schools and ISD's have no say over grades for college courses.

This information was compiled and written for Houston Community College students using online tutoring.  This is the intellectual property of Houston Community College.

 

File High School v College Expectations (handout 1) dual credit College classes, expectations, and assignments are different from those in high school. Basic descriptions of high school and college atmospheres are shown in this table. Faculty members (professors and instructors) follow the rules of their departments, but the faculty members mostly have freedom to conduct their classes as they see fit. Those policies are clearly stated in your professors’ syllabi. It is your responsibility to know and understand the policies in your courses. [The PDF version of this document does not have searchable headings, but you can still press Ctrl+F to find key words and phrases.] File High School v College Assignments (handout 2) dual credit Any college student, regardless of high school success or other achievements, can experience difficulties adjusting to college courses. Even when you understand the course materials, you must approach courses and assignments differently than you did in high school. Understanding course structure, grades, and scholastic honesty will help you succeed in college. [The PDF version of this document does not have searchable headings, but you can still press Ctrl+F to find key words and phrases.] File High School v College Accountability and Responsibilities (handout 3) dual credit In college, you are responsible for your own actions and your own course performance. It is your responsibility to monitor your progress and discuss your performance with your professors in a timely manner. By law, professors cannot respond to correspondence about your performance from anyone except you. No one, not even your parent, guardian or spouse, can ask your professors for explanations about why you received a grade on an assignment or your overall course progress. It does not matter who pays your tuition or who signed you up for courses. [The PDF version of this document does not have searchable headings, but you can still press Ctrl+F to find key words and phrases.]