1302 12426 Syllabus fall 2021

Instructional Services · English and Communication · English

Composition II-12426ENGL-1302

  • SS 2021
  • Section 0024
  • 3 Credits
  • 09/20/2021 to 12/12/2021
  • Modified 09/10/2021

Course Meetings

Course Modality

Online (Asynchronous)

Meeting Days

Online (Asynchronous)

Meeting Times

Online (Asynchronous)

Meeting Location

Online (Asynchronous)

Welcome and Instructor Information

Instructor: Dr. Randall Watson

What's Exciting About This Course

The Department of English helps students find and develop their authentic voices, establish political power, and create social capital.  We teach critical thinking, close reading, and analysis.  We coach students on the rhetoric of messaging with consideration of purpose and audience.  We support them as they craft their own narratives. We turn thoughts into words, ideas into interpretations, ambiguity into translation, and silence into voice.

My Personal Welcome

Hello Everyone,

 

Welcome to 1302 Online. We’ll be researching and debating the issue of

‘marijuana legalization’ over the course of our 12 week session. For years such

discussions were somewhat pointless as the actual possibility of legalization was so

remote. But now that several states have legalized marijuana for recreational (not

just medical) purposes it is an issue residents of Texas may very well be voting on

within a number of years—especially given that the debate unites various people

from political ideologies across the spectrum. Recently, you may have noticed the proliferation

of places where you can purchase CBD, a form of medical marijuana (non-psychoactive) as

Texas has already legalized it.

 

So--things are changing quickly. Anyway—I figure we could all benefit by learning as

much as we can about this topic, sorting out the facts from the assumptions and the

rumors: thus the focus of this course.

 

The course is centered on weekly discussions. There will be one discussion

per week (for 10 weeks), with a set window within which you must complete the assignment.

(See“Discussions” on the syllabus and the Assignments/Announcements pages in Canvas)

Each discussion presents a link to some aspect of the topic. You watch the video and/or read

the articles and then post a 200 word response that presents both your response to the

material as well as showing that you are familiar with the content presented. You also respond

to at least two of your classmates’ postings.

Each discussion is open for 7 days. Again, you will find them under the Discussions link in the

course content. Also, please see the syllabus for information regarding the content of the

discussions. Also again, make sure to read the Assignments and Announcements sections in

the course content, as they go into more detail on the assignments.

 

You will also be writing an Annotated Bibliography and a Research Essay, as

well as taking a test on MLA formatting style, 8th Edition, by exclusively using the

Purdue Owl MLA formatting guide. Please make a careful note of the deadlines for

all these assignments, as no late assignments will accepted. It is imperative that you

complete all assignments within the allotted time frame. If you have any questions,

please email me at [email protected]

 

Remember, the pace of a 12 week course is more intense than a normal 16

week semester, so you need to complete all assignments by their due dates. No late

assignments can be accepted. In order to be fair, every student must receive the

same opportunity to complete their coursework. I cannot emphasize this enough--

completing all coursework correctly and on time is your responsibility and one you

must meet in order to be successful in this course.

 

I wish you all a successful semester.

 

Dr. Watson

Preferred Method of Contact

[email protected]

 

Please contact me through our Canvas Course.

Office Hours

  • Online
  • Online

Please contact me through our Canvas Course email with any questions, issues etc. We can schedule a video conference if needed.

  •  

Course Overview

Course Description

English 1302 is an intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts. Emphasis is on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions. Core curriculum course.

Requisites

English 1301 or satisfactory score on the CLEP Exam. 

English Department

https://www.hccs.edu/programs/areas-of-study/liberal-arts-humanities--education/english/

Core Curriculum Objectives (CCOs)

English courses satisfy three (3) hours of the communication requirement in the HCCS core curriculum.  The HCCS English Discipline Committee has specified that courses address the following core objectives:

  • Critical Thinking: Students will demonstrate creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information.
  • Communication: Students will demonstrate effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral, and visual communication.
  • Personal Responsibility: Students will demonstrate the ability to connect choices, actions, and consequences to ethical decision-making.
  • Teamwork: Students will demonstrate the ability to consider different points of view and to work effectively with others to support a shared purpose or goal. 
    • Composition I, Composition II, Creative Writing, Introduction to Technical Writing, and Technical & Business Writing only
  • Social Responsibility: Students will demonstrate intercultural competency, knowledge of civic responsibility, and the ability to engage effectively in regional, national, and global communities.
    • Literature courses only

Student Learning Outcomes and Objectives

Program Student Learning Outcomes (PSLOs) 

Can be found at:

https://www.hccs.edu/programs/areas-of-study/liberal-arts-humanities--education/english/

Course Student Learning Outcomes (CSLOs) 

Upon successful completion of ENGL 1302, the student will be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of individual and collaborative research processes.
  • Develop ideas and synthesize primary and secondary sources within focused academic arguments, including one or more research-based essays.
  • Analyze, interpret, and evaluate a variety of texts for the ethical and logical uses of evidence.
  • Write in a style that clearly communicates meaning, builds credibility, and inspires belief or action.
  • Apply the conventions of style manuals for specific academic disciplines (e.g., APA, CMS, MLA, etc.)

Word Count Requirement 

Students will write a minimum of 5,000 words over the course of the semester. 

Departmental Practices and Procedures

Department-Specific Instructor and Student Responsibilities

As your Instructor, it is my responsibility to:

  • Provide the grading scale and detailed grading formula explaining how student grades are to be calculated
  • Facilitate an effective learning environment through class activities, discussions, and lectures
  • Provide a description of any assignments
  • Inform students of policies
  • Provide the course outline and class calendar that will include a description of assignments
  • Arrange to meet with individual students as required

As a student, it is your responsibility to:

  • Attend class and participate in class discussions and activities
  • Read and comprehend the texts
  • Complete the required assignments
  • Ask for help when there is a question or problem
  • Keep copies of all documents, including this syllabus, handouts, and all assignments
  • Be aware of and comply with academic honesty policies, including plagiarism, in the HCCS Student Handbook

Program-Specific Student Success Information

As with any three-hour course, expect to spend at least six hours per week outside of class reading and studying the material.  I will provide assignments to help you use those six hours per week wisely.  Additional time will be required for written assignments.  Successful completion of this course requires a combination of reading the textbook, attending class, completing assignments in Eagle Online, and participating in class discussions.  There is no short cut for success in this course; it requires reading (and probably re-reading) and studying the material using the course objectives as your guide.

 

Instructional Materials and Resources

Instructional Materials

We will be using free online sources for all of our assignments.

Course Requirements

Assignments, Exams, and Activities

Written Assignments and Essays

 

Students will write a minimum of 5,000 words over the course of the semester. 

Research Paper and Process: Students will produce a specific, unified, developed, organized, and coherent research paper of at minimum 2100 words using at least EIGHT sources, both print and non-print. Students will show competency in a research paper process of choosing and narrowing topics, collecting sources from indexes, creating a working bibliography, taking notes from sources, using sources in proper MLA formats, and providing proper documentation for those sources. Sources must be credible and come from a variety of fields.  You must include at least THREE SOURCES from scholarly periodicals. Other sources may include books, magazines, newspapers, websites, personal interviews, TV shows/documentaries etc.

 

The topic is the Legalization of Marijuana.

 

Annotated Bibliography:The Annotated Bibliography Will include between 10 and 15 sources formatted according to MLA 8THEDITION (Modern Language Association) guidelines found on the Purdue Owl. Each entry must include a summary of 100 to 150 words. See below for an example demonstrating the format.

 

Also—there is a link to the HCC Library within our course. All our MLA formatting will follow the Purdue Owl webpage guide to MLA Formatting, 8thEdition. This is where you will go to look up the answers to the MLA Formatting Test, as well as to format your Annotated Bibliography and your Research Essay.

 

The topic is the Legalization of Marijuana.

 

EXAMS

 

MLA Formatting Quiz: You will complete the multiple choice test using the Purdue OWL Website. All answers are based on the 8thEdition of the MLA Handbook. You have a lot of time to complete this quiz, but don’t enter your answers until you are done.

 

 

IMPORTANT: NO LATE ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED

 

More Information Regarding the Assignments:

 All essay assignments will be graded on grammar, syntax, a coherent essay structure with an engaging introductory paragraph, a clearly stated thesis followed by organized, unified supporting paragraphs that are adequately developed with a logical, coherent presentation of ideas within each paragraph, including specific examples demonstrating the ideas presented, and a clear summation of the argument in the conclusion.

 

In addition, the Research Paper and Annotated Bibliography need to follow all the 8thEdition MLA guidelines for paper format, in-text citations, and the Works Cited page as presented on the Purdue Owl MLA Format Guide.

 

Regarding Discussion posts, the grade will be based on three criteria: fulfilling the minimum 200 word contribution, two responses to classmates, grammatically/syntactically correct entries, and the quality of your analysis (which should contain specific references to the sources read for that week’s discussion).

 

See more detailed description on the Announcements page of our Canvas course.

 

MORE ON ASSIGNMENTS

 

Discussions:

 

It is imperative that you participate in all discussions. There are 10, each worth a possible 10 points. These points are given based on: grammar and syntax, an entry that shows familiarity with the specifics of the reading/viewing assignment, making the minimum 200 word contribution and the two responses, and the quality of the commentary. Each missed assignment will lower your average by 10 points, so please do not miss any.

 

Annotated Bibliography:

 

You must include at least 10 sources with at least 100 words summarizing and commenting on the contents of each source. The format should conform to the MLA Guidelines (8thEdition) as presented on the Purdue Owl (see link in the course—and see comments below).

 

 

Research Essay:

 

The essay must be at least 2100 words and should conform to MLA Guidelines (8thEdition) as presented by the Purdue Owl. This means all sources in your essay—direct quotes, paraphrases, and summaries, must be identified using the MLA format for In-text Citations. Each source identified by In-Text Citations must have a corresponding citation on the Works Cited page. Conversely, all sources on the Works Cited page must be identified in the body of the essay using MLA Format for In-Text Citations. Failure to follow these guidelines is technically plagiarism and grounds for receiving a 0 on the assignment.

 

 

MLA Test: You have a lot of time to complete what is essentially an open book assignment. Look up the answers to each question on the Purdue OWL MLA Format Guidelines. (See link and comments below.) It is not difficult, but it takes time. Do not put it off.

 

 

General Suggestions Regarding MLA Format:

 

You need to read the Purdue Owl website section on MLA Format guidelines (8thEdition). You will see various sections—from the Overview to MLA In-Text Citations: The Basics to the MLA Works Cited  Page: Basic Format, to MLA General Format, etc. You have to look up how to format individual citation regarding In-Text Citations and the Works Cited entries using the various subheadings. You should look at both the Sample Paper and the Sample Works Cited Page. All the information is located on this website and it is your responsibility to find it. This is a fundamental part of your course work and you will not be able to successfully complete any of the assignments, except for the discussion entries, if you don’t do it.

 

NO LATE ASSIGNMENTS WILL BE ACCEPTED, SO PLEASE GET YOUR WORK DONE ON TIME!

 

 

 

The Annotated Bibliography

 

WHAT IS AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY?

An annotated bibliography is a list of citations to books, articles, and documents. Each citation is followed by a brief (usually about 150 words) descriptive and evaluative paragraph, the annotation. The purpose of the annotation is to inform the reader of the relevance, accuracy, and quality of the sources cited.

ANNOTATIONS VS. ABSTRACTS

Abstracts are the purely descriptive summaries often found at the beginning of scholarly journal articles or in periodical indexes. Annotations are descriptive and critical; they expose the author's point of view, clarity and appropriateness of expression, and authority.

THE PROCESS

Creating an annotated bibliography calls for the application of a variety of intellectual skills: concise exposition, succinct analysis, and informed library research.

First, locate and record citations to books, periodicals, and documents that may contain useful information and ideas on your topic. Briefly examine and review the actual items. Then choose those works that provide a variety of perspectives on your topic.

Cite the book, article, or document using the appropriate style (MLA 8thEdition: see the Purdue Owl).

Write a concise annotation that summarizes the central theme and scope of the book or article. Include one or more sentences that (a) evaluate the authority or background of the author, (b) comment on the intended audience, (c) compare or contrast this work with another you have cited, or (d) explain how this work illuminates your bibliography topic.

 

Essay Requirements

 

All essays will be typed, and double-spaced. They will be graded for the quality of the analysis according to the parameters of the particular assignment, as well as appropriateness, unity and focus, coherence, development, organization, grammar and syntax. They will be submitted via the course submission upload—as well as (as a back-up)in an email to me at [email protected]in two simultaneous formats.

 

  1. As an MS Word Attachment and 
  2. Copied and pasted into the body of the SAME email the essay is attached to.

 

 

COURSE CONTENT

 

This is a 12 week online course. The pace of the assignments will thus be  rapid, and thereby challenging. As such, I have chosen a single subject as the topic of our class analysis: the legalization of marijuana. Honestly, I have avoided this subject in the past for a variety of reasons, but with the recent changes in various state laws and the District of Columbia this topic has become immediately relevant. Thus your assignment is to research the subject and construct an argument (in your research essay) as to whether or not you think marijuana should be legalized or not. This will require research into the dangers of marijuana (ie. its toxicity—smoked or ingested etc.; its impact on personality—intellectual and psychological/emotional development etc.) and its benefits (ie. medical—anti-emetic, stress relief, glaucoma, cancer treatment, seizures etc.). Other arguments to research include legal and moral issues, from individual rights, effects on society, and spiritual or ethical perspectives (regarding the use of any mind altering substances, which would also apply to the use of marijuana). Remember, it is not necessarily an either/or answer, legalize or don’t legalize. Your thesis could narrow the topic to more restricted arguments which may include allowing some legal uses for marijuana but prohibiting its use in other ways (medical marijuana is one example of this). You might be for legalization but argue that only if it is regulated in a precise manner. The main thing is to find a thesis you can work with, that you can argue. Once you’ve arrived at what you think will be your thesis, check with me via email to confirm that you are on the right track.

 

Remember, a good argument, whether you are for legalization or against it, is an informed argument. This means you need to be aware of and address aspects of the arguments that are opposed to your thesis as well as those which support it.

 

 

ONLINE DISCUSSIONS

 

You must contribute at least 200 words to each discussion in your initial posting—and respond to at least two of your classmates’ postings (No minimum word count is required for your responses. The point is to stimulate discussion.) Your participation in the online discussions makes up 25% of your final grade, so do take care to make sure your postings are grammatically correct and thoughtful and on-time. The grade will be based on four criteria: fulfilling the minimum 200 word contribution, two responses to classmates, grammatically/syntactically correct entries, and the quality of your analysis (which should contain specific references to the sources read for that week’s discussion).

 

You must complete your contribution to the weekly discussions within the allotted timeframe.

 

All assignments must be completed on time. No late work will be accepted.

 

 

 

**All aspects of the syllabus are subject to revision at the instructor’s discretion.

Types of evaluations and related weights

Type

Weight

Topic

Notes

Written Assignment

25%

Legalization of Marijuana

Research Paper

Exams/Quizzes

25%

MLA Test

Discussions

25%

See the Weekly Discussions.

Weekly Discussions on various aspects of our Research topic: The legalization of Marijuana.

 

(Again--see the detailed description of assignments above).

Annotated Bibliography

25%

Legalization of Marijuana

See the detailed description of the assignment in the section above.

Extra Credit: Library Presentations

A Possible total of 9 points added to your lowest grade.

MLA Format/Research methods

Presentations covering various critical aspects of MLA format.

Grading Formula

Resulting grade and related performance levels

Grade

Range

Notes

A

90 and above

B

80 to 89

C

70 to 79

D

60 to 69

F

Below 60

Instructor's Practices and Procedures

Incomplete Policy

In order to receive a grade of Incomplete (“I”), a student must have completed at least 85% of the work in the course. In all cases, the instructor reserves the right to decline a student’s request to receive a grade of Incomplete.

 

Incompletes are rarely given.

Missed Assignments/Make-Up Policy

Late assignments are not accepted.

Academic Integrity

Here’s the link to the HCC information about academic integrity (Scholastic Dishonesty and Violation of Academic Scholastic Dishonesty and Grievance):

https://www.hccs.edu/about-hcc/procedures/student-rights-policies--procedures/student-procedures/

Instructor’s Course-Specific Information

I will have all assignments graded within a week of the due date.

Faculty-Specific Information Regarding Canvas

This course section will use Canvas (https://eagleonline.hccs.edu) to supplement in-class assignments, exams, and activities.  

HCCS Open Lab locations may be used to access the Internet and Canvas.  For best performance, Canvas should be used on the current or first previous major release of Chrome, Firefox, Edge, or Safari. Because it's built using web standards, Canvas runs on Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, or any other device with a modern web browser. 

Canvas only requires an operating system that can run the latest compatible web browsers. Your computer operating system should be kept up to date with the latest recommended security updates and upgrades.  

Faculty Statement about Student Success

Hi everyone

 

i cover this in my Welcome Statement--but if you begin work on the Research Paper right away this will also help you complete your Annotated Bibliography. A few hours a week will help you avoid having to do your work at the last minute--and this will generally improve the quality of your work and your academic success.

HCC Policies and Information

HCC Grading System

HCC uses the following standard grading system:

Grade

Grade Interpretation

Grade Points

A

Excellent (90-100)

4

B

Good (80-89)

3

C

Fair (70-79)

2

D

Passing (60-69), except in developmental courses.

1

F

Failing (59 and below)

0

FX

Failing due to non-attendance

0

W

Withdrawn

0

I

Incomplete

0

AUD

Audit

0

IP

In Progress. Given only in certain developmental courses. A student must re-enroll to receive credit.

0

COM

Completed. Given in non-credit and continuing education courses.

0

Link to Policies in Student Handbook

Here’s the link to the HCC Student Handbook https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/current-students/student-handbook/   In it you will find information about the following:

  • Academic Information
  • Academic Support
  • Attendance, Repeating Courses, and Withdrawal
  • Career Planning and Job Search
  • Childcare
  • disAbility Support Services
  • Electronic Devices
  • Equal Educational Opportunity
  • Financial Aid TV (FATV)
  • General Student Complaints
  • Grade of FX
  • Incomplete Grades
  • International Student Services
  • Health Awareness
  • Libraries/Bookstore
  • Police Services & Campus Safety
  • Student Life at HCC
  • Student Rights and Responsibilities
  • Student Services
  • Testing
  • Transfer Planning
  • Veteran Services

Link to HCC Academic Integrity Statement

https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/faculty/student-conduct-resources-for-faculty/

Campus Carry Link

Here’s the link to the HCC information about Campus Carry:

https://www.hccs.edu/departments/police/campus-carry/

HCC Email Policy

When communicating via email, HCC requires students to communicate only through the HCC email system to protect your privacy.  If you have not activated your HCC student email account, you can go to HCC Eagle ID and activate it now.  You may also use Canvas Inbox to communicate.

Office of Institutional Equity

Use the link below to access the HCC Office of Institutional Equity, Inclusion, and Engagement (https://www.hccs.edu/departments/institutional-equity/)

Ability Services

HCC strives to make all learning experiences as accessible as possible.  If you anticipate or experience academic barriers based on your disability (including long and short term conditions, mental health, chronic or temporary medical conditions), please meet with a campus Abilities Counselor as soon as possible in order to establish reasonable accommodations.  Reasonable accommodations are established through an interactive process between you, your instructor(s) and Ability Services.  It is the policy and practice of HCC to create inclusive and accessible learning environments consistent with federal and state law.  For more information, please go to https://www.hccs.edu/support-services/ability-services/

Title IX

Houston Community College is committed to cultivating an environment free from inappropriate conduct of a sexual or gender-based nature including sex discrimination, sexual assault, sexual harassment, and sexual violence.  Sex discrimination includes all forms of sexual and gender-based misconduct and violates an individual’s fundamental rights and personal dignity.  Title IX prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex-including pregnancy and parental status in educational programs and activities.  If you require an accommodation due to pregnancy please contact an Abilities Services Counselor.  The Director of EEO/Compliance is designated as the Title IX Coordinator and Section 504 Coordinator.  All inquiries concerning HCC policies, compliance with applicable laws, statutes, and regulations (such as Title VI, Title IX, and Section 504), and complaints may be directed to:

David Cross
Director EEO/Compliance
Office of Institutional Equity & Diversity
3100 Main
(713) 718-8271
Houston, TX 77266-7517 or [email protected]

http://www.hccs.edu/departments/institutional-equity/title-ix-know-your-rights/

Office of the Dean of Students

Contact the office of the Dean of Students to seek assistance in determining the correct complaint procedure to follow or to identify the appropriate academic dean or supervisor for informal resolution of complaints.

https://www.hccs.edu/about-hcc/procedures/student-rights-policies--procedures/student-complaints/speak-with-the-dean-of-students/

Student Success

Expect to spend at least twice as many hours per week outside of class as you do in class studying the course content.  Additional time will be required for written assignments.  The assignments provided will help you use your study hours wisely.  Successful completion of this course requires a combination of the following:

  • Reading the textbook
  • Attending class in person and/or online
  • Completing assignments
  • Participating in class activities

There is no short cut for success in this course; it requires reading (and probably re-reading) and studying the material using the course objectives as a guide.

Canvas Learning Management System

Canvas is HCC’s Learning Management System (LMS), and can be accessed at the following URL:

https://eagleonline.hccs.edu

HCCS Open Lab locations may be used to access the Internet and Canvas.  For best performance, Canvas should be used on the current or first previous major release of Chrome, Firefox, Edge, or Safari. Because it's built using web standards, Canvas runs on Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, or any other device with a modern web browser. 

Canvas only requires an operating system that can run the latest compatible web browsers. Your computer operating system should be kept up to date with the latest recommended security updates and upgrades.  

 

HCC Online Information and Policies

Here is the link to information about HCC Online classes, which includes access to the required Online Information Class Preview for all fully online classes: https://www.hccs.edu/online/

Scoring Rubrics, Sample Assignments, etc.

Look in Canvas for the scoring rubrics for assignments, samples of class assignments, and other information to assist you in the course.  https://eagleonline.hccs.edu/login/ldap

Instructor and Student Responsibilities

As your Instructor, it is my responsibility to:

  • Provide the grading scale and detailed grading formula explaining how student grades are to be derived
  • Facilitate an effective learning environment through learner-centered instructional techniques
  • Provide a description of any special projects or assignments
  • Inform students of policies such as attendance, withdrawal, tardiness, and making up assignments
  • Provide the course outline and class calendar that will include a description of any special projects or assignments
  • Arrange to meet with individual students during office hours, and before and after class as required

As a student, it is your responsibility to:

  • Attend class in person and/or online
  • Participate actively by reviewing course material, interacting with classmates, and responding promptly in your communication with me
  • Read and comprehend the textbook
  • Complete the required assignments and exams
  • Ask for help when there is a question or problem
  • Keep copies of all paperwork, including this syllabus, handouts, and all assignments
  • Be aware of and comply with academic honesty policies in the HCCS Student Handbook

EGLS3

The EGLS3 (Evaluation for Greater Learning Student Survey System) will be available for most courses near the end of the term until finals start.  This brief survey will give invaluable information to your faculty about their teaching.  Results are anonymous and will be available to faculty and division chairs after the end of the term.  EGLS3 surveys are only available for the Fall and Spring semesters.  EGLS3 surveys are not offered during the Summer semester due to logistical constraints.

https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/current-students/egls3-evaluate-your-professors/

Housing and Food Assistance for Students

Any student who faces challenges securing their foods or housing and believes this may affect their performance in the course is urged to contact the Dean of Students at their college for support. Furthermore, please notify the professor if you are comfortable in doing so.  

This will enable HCC to provide any resources that HCC may possess.

Student Resources

Tutoring

HCC provides free, confidential, and convenient academic support, including writing critiques,  to HCC students in an online environment and on campus.  Tutoring is provided by HCC personnel in order to ensure that it is contextual and appropriate.  Visit the HCC Tutoring Services website for services provided.

Libraries

The HCC Library System consists of 9 libraries and 6 Electronic Resource Centers (ERCs) that are inviting places to study and collaborate on projects.  Librarians are available both at the libraries and online to show you how to locate and use the resources you need.  The libraries maintain a large selection of electronic resources as well as collections of books, magazines, newspapers, and audiovisual materials.  The portal to all libraries’ resources and services is the HCCS library web page at https://library.hccs.edu.

Supplementary Instruction

Supplemental Instruction is an academic enrichment and support program that uses peer-assisted study sessions to improve student retention and success in historically difficult courses.  Peer Support is provided by students who have already succeeded in completion of the specified course, and who earned a grade of A or B.  Find details at https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/current-students/supplemental-instruction/.

Resources for Students:

https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/current-students/communicable-diseases/resources-for-students/

Basic Needs Resources:

https://www.hccs.edu/support-services/counseling/hcc-cares/basic-needs-resources/

Student Basic Needs Application:

https://hccs.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_25WyNx7NwMRz1FH

COVID-19

Here’s the link to the HCC information about COVID-19:

https://www.hccs.edu/resources-for/current-students/communicable-diseases/  

Sensitive or Mature Course Content

In this college-level course, we may occasionally discuss sensitive or mature content. All members of the classroom environment, from your instructor to your fellow students, are expected to handle potentially controversial subjects with respect and consideration for one another’s varied experiences and values.  

Instructional Modalities

In-Person (P)

Safe, face-to-face course with scheduled dates and times

Online on a Schedule (WS)

Fully online course with virtual meetings at scheduled dates and times

Online Anytime (WW)

Traditional online course without scheduled meetings

Hybrid (H)

Course that meets safely 50% face-to-face and 50% virtually

Hybrid Lab (HL)

Lab class that meets safely 50% face-to-face and 50% virtually

Course Calendar

Syllabus Modifications

The instructor reserves the right to modify the syllabus at any time during the semester and will promptly notify students in writing, typically by e-mail, of any such changes.

Additional Information

Process for Expressing Concerns about the Course

If you have concerns about any aspect of this course, please reach out to your instructor for assistance first. If your instructor is not able to assist you, then you may wish to contact the Department Chair. 

Dr. Mary Lawson, [email protected], 713.718.2365